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CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00am EST
several sites to document their historical significance and view the landscape today. from washington's crossing of the delaware to the battle of her clan. it's about an hour, 15. [applause] >> the subtitle of this book is an old irishman not being funny, so it's a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known two geniuses in my life. one is dead and the other robert sullivan is alive although that robert sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don't know and the one that brings us here to delancey st., "my american revolution." in my humble opinion each of these books is in its way a masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive, e. tizon investigation of the american mindscape and sulzgeber related with the american landscape. each confronts the obvious, where there are garbage drunk -- garbage dump or a family
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:15am EST
1838, dolly madison moved back to washington. she owned a house on i lafayette square, a block and a half from the white house. jeepings was a member of the -- jennings was a member of the staff so like it or not, he went back to washington too. he had come of age in washington, serving on the madison domestic staff from age 10 to age 18. he had considered running away when that period of time was up, but instead, in the end, went back to montpelier. after all, that was his home too. he was not ready to never see his mother and other kin again, and he was the only eyewitness who left an account at the desk of james madison, but now, dolly madison was selling month peelier, and that separated jennings from his own wife and children. he had married an enslaved woman at a nearby plantation to month montpelier, and that meant their five chirp, as they came along, were owned by his wife's owner. they had barely been able to get together by once a week, and now, jennings was moving from virginia all together. his wife dies about the same time. now these are motherless children back in virg
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
inauguration day in washington d.c. a huge amount of people gathered on the washington mall. 2009 it was all away from the capital of a way to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. there we go. and they are there, of course, for the inauguration. people gathered to watch in other places as well. in times square in new york city, classrooms around the country, paris, barack, afghanistan, people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they have all come there. there is a big crowd of a mall. of going to speak to you today about this great historic subject to my great american institution the end of not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which i organize the book rather, the book is not chronological, it's not divided up. this touch of a george washington in mid john adams and went to the president in order. instead is divided up by the various parts of the day. within each part of the day i sprinkle in vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them, of course, very traditional command a lot of them on all events because i'm always looking for those, too. i'm also g
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:45pm EST
novels on george washington, what a better pattern than to weave these giants, ronald reagan, after whom the soviet empire disappeared, and george washington after whom he can a country. what are the lessons of history? it will study the history because it is an interesting have it. i studied history to better understand present and the future so that i can be engaged in making history by being an intelligent person. that is what citizenship ought to be. and so what are some of the lessons klaxon not me start with the fiscal cliff i want to say something like the contract for america, the balanced budget, welfare reform. ronald reagan's supply-side economics, i'm proud of the number of things that made no sense in washington. there is no fiscal clef. this is absolute total nonsense. the best way to understand what happens to all of us is to write a great essay by thomas wolfe entitled of the flag catchers. this goes back i think to the 60's when he first wrote this. now, she's trying to describe the particular pattern in san francisco in which the welfare department has figured out
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 1:15pm EST
inside account of how washington abandoned mainstream while rescuing longstreet. he argues that the $700 billion troubled asset relief program or t.a.r.p. program was mishandled. about 40 minutes. >> joining as now his kneele brodsky, a former inspector general for tart -- t.a.r.p. you saw him earlier on a panel. here's the cover of his best seller called "bailout." how did you become the inspector general? >> it is kind of a strange thing, especially for me. i was a federal prosecutor up in the southern district of new york. i spent the years leading into the financial crisis during securities fraud cases and earlier in 2008i started the mortgage fraud group that was targeting, you know, those types of cases that really helped lead to the financial crisis, major fraud in the mortgage finance system. so after the t.a.r.p. bill was passed, congress enacted this marble piece of legislation, they included within this new agency called the office of the specialized sector general for the trouble as a relief program. this incredibly great, you know, washington is the city of acronyms, an
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:30am EST
and it plans date today. from washington's crossing of the dollar to the battle of brooklyn, it is about an hour and 15. [applause] >> this subtitle of this book is old irishman. it is a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known to geniuses in my life. one is dead, and the other, robert sullivan, is alive. although that reversal in is not the robber solomon he was receiving. not exactly, but more but then the moment. first, brazil and is the author of seven extra hour bucks. meadowlands, will hunt, how not to get rich, rats, cross-country , the throw you don't know, and the one that brings us here, my american revolution. in mine and humble opinion each of these books is its own line and masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive. each is an investigation of the american my state and song skate into relative with the american landscape. fleet contends the obvious, whether a garbage dump comes or the species despise rodents or family richard or a transcendental and back and allows us to see what we didn't and will we couldn't wil
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 7:00pm EST
neil barofsky talks about his book, bail out an inside account of how washington amended main street while rescuing wall street. he argues that the 700 billion-dollar troubled asset relief program or t.a.r.p. bailout fund was mishandled. it's about 40 minutes. >> joining us now is neil barofsky, former inspector general for t.a.r.p.. you saw him earlier on the panel. here's the cover of his bestseller. it's called bailout. .. >> i was nominated by my boss, and it was this crazy whirlwind when i had that conversation and was serving. >> what was the date he that you started? >> december 15, 2008. >> what are your politics? you the bush administration, essentially, but what are your politics? >> i have been a lifelong democrat. since i was old enough to go. vote. i have always been a registered democrat. it is actually kind of funny. when the u.s. attorney approach me and asked me if i was interested in the job, i was going to different excuses as to why didn't want to go to washington. i was very happy being with a prosecutor. i was getting married. finally, when all those argu
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 6:00pm EST
country including assaults that spurredded george washington to proclaim the protesters vandals. this about 50 # -- 50 # minutes. >> there is nothing so easy but to persuade people they are badly governed. those words were spoken by the brilliant 18th century massachusetts governor thomas hutchenson, and i'll tell you more about him later. let me tell you what else he said because the words hold true today as much as they did then in 1774. governor hutchenson said you can take the happiest and most comfortable people and use malicious, rhetorical skills to arouse popular discontent with their government, with their rulers, with everything around them, even themselves. this is one of the weaknesses, he said, these are his words "one of the weaknesses of human nature of which ambitious politicians make you to serve their purposes." i year before he uttered those words, a group of boston rebel rowsers convinced americans they were miserable, and to quote hitchenson again, "those who think they are misrabble are so despite real evidence to the contrary." now, i doubt if there's a single o
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 6:00pm EST
of ideas for any more books on the founding fathers. others have written on washington, jefferson, madison and i had written on patrick henry, james monroe, john hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's pulitzer prize-winning book, profiles in courage and daring chapter one was john quincy adams. so i thought his name begins begins with a comma on the season chapter one. but i was not the reason. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of coverage and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american has terry. he was not just the sixth president of the united states. he was a congressman as well for 16 years and a senator for four. most americans don't realize he was a congressman. many don't even know he was president. >> well, you're going to change that. >> yes. he was this enormously courageous congressmen, the first congressman to stand up and call for emancipation before linking even knew how to spell the word. >> will get back to institution in a moment. a friend of mine who is a la
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
great american venue so let's begin. it's dawn on inauguration day in washington, d.c.. a huge amount of people gather on the washington mall. in 2009 and was all the way from the capitol all the way to the lincoln memorial. we just lost our picture. they are there for the inauguration. people gather to watch and other places as well. in times square in the new york city and classrooms around the country in paris and iraq and afghanistan people are watching the u.s. presidential inauguration. they've all come there and there is a big crowd on the mall. i'm going to speak to you today about this great historic subject come of this institution and i am not -- i'm going to do it in the same way in which organized the book. rather the book is not chronological. it's not divided that starts off with george washington and then john adams to going to the president. instead it is divided by the various parts of the day and then i sprinkle vignettes. some of them very serious, some of them of course very traditional, and a lot of them i'm always looking for those, too. i also going to cover so
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:00am EST
the "washington post" and our website is rachelscox.com. and this is her first book. "into dust and fire: five young americans who went first to fight the nazis." this is booktv on c-span2. >> with about one month left in 2012, many publications are putting out their year-end lists of notable books. booktv will feature several of these lists focusing on nonfiction selections. these nonfiction titles were included in the "washington post" best books of 2012. >> for a link visit booktv's website, booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> you may recognize garrett peck from a former bookie did on probation in washington, d.c. is back at local history with a new book on the potomac river, a history and guide. what does the potomac river start and end of? >> it is near davis west virginia, a tiny little trickle that comes out of the side of the mountain and then it ends at point a look at which is 11 miles wide. the river is pretty wide at the mouth in between there's a huge amount of history. hundreds of historic sites. this is where our nation grew up on. it also has to
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:15am EST
information on events. facebook.com/booktv. >> from the 12 and a national book festival in washington, d.c., and interview a national viewer phone calls with "washington post" senior correspondent an associate editor rajiv chandrasekeran who discusses his book "little america: the war within the war for afghanistan." it's about 20 minutes. >> we are back live at the national book festival here in washington, d.c. this is day one of two days of coverage. the book festival has now expanded to two days, and booktv will be live both days. if you want to see our full schedule go to booktv.org. we are pleased now to be joined here on our booktv set with rajiv chandrasekeran, an associate editor at the "washington post," and most recently the author of this book, "little america," about the war in afghanistan. wicked the term little america come from? >> little america came from this remarkable project in the 1950s, led by teams of american engineers to develop parts of southern afghanistan to dig irrigation canals, build dams. in the very same terrain the current troops urge unfolded in. back th
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 4:15pm EST
annual national book festival on the national mall in washington d.c. robert caro presents the fourth volume of his biography of lyndon johnson, "the passage of power," the years of lyndon johnson. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. that was such a wonderful introduction. such a wonderful introduction it reminds me what lyndon johnson used to say when he got a nice introduction. he used to say he wished his parents were alive to hear it. he said his father would have loved it and his mother would have believed it. you know, when winston churchill was writing his great biography of his ancestors someone asked him how -- he said i am working on the fifth of a projected four volumes. i am not comparing myself to winston churchill but regard to the lyndon johnson biography we are in the same boat. i have been writing about lyndon johnson so long that people ask me don't you get bored? the answer is the very opposite is true. the one reason i don't think of these books as being about lyndon johnson just as i didn't think of the power brokers being about ro
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 5:15pm EST
the dollar. the threat comes from washington and wall street. i make that new arguments in the new edition of "wealth and poverty." >> george gilder come you rate the united states over the last decade has witnessed a classic confrontation between the forces of entrepreneurial capitalism and those of established institutions, claiming a higher virtue, expertise and political standing. once i subsist on unforced for the enterprise. the other on branson told some privileges at the treasury, the federal reserve and the white house. >> that is exactly what we've had. when michael lewis wrote up a bit short. he is writing about all the jackal of hedge funds and the bed against the big banks were all supporting these subprime mortgages concoctions, confections and scans. it was all the most prestigious forces in both u.s. and the world economy that backed the blindsided by collet, people who are investing in these crazy concocted mortgage securities in which the value was totally unknown by the people investing in a period the people shorting means were hatch funds in venture funds and p
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 10:00pm EST
was a couple of days' ride from monticello to washington. he stopped at an inn and falls into a conversation with a fellow guest and they have a lovely, wide ranging discussion the next morning the other guest mr. jefferson is up and out and the other guest had never called his name and he said to the inn keeper who was that and he said who did you think it was? for a while and you knew so much about medicine i thought he was a doctor. then we talked about theology and he seemed as though he might be a priest though a shaky one. i thought he could have been certainly a farmer because of everything he knew and he said i thought you knew mr. jefferson. he was a master of so many different worlds and he was indefinitely curious at the time when human curiosity and the ability to lead us to our own destiny to fulfil in many ways our greatest potentials to discover, to explore was new in the world and this was the enlightened era. they had been a day before yesterday. for the first time ever, priestley and princely authority was in the dhaka, and jefferson was there to reap the harve
CSPAN
Dec 20, 2012 12:00pm EST
businesses and people. and many of those states will come here to washington and ask us to help them out from their bad decisions. i hope at that time that we can show by pointing at these states and these right ideas that we know the solutions at the state level and that we also know that we can change how we think here at the federal level and make our country work a lot better. i i leave here with a lot of respect for my colleagues. i know my democrat colleagues believe with conviction their ideas. and i know my republican colleagues do too. but i hope we can look at the facts. i hope we can look at the real world. i hope we can look at what's working and set aside the politics and realize what really makes this country great and strong is when we move dollars and decisions out of washington back to people and communities and to states, that it works. not for 2% but for 100% of americans. i feel like our customers in the senate, at the heritage foundation, or wherever we go, are 100% of americans who these ideas can work for to build a better future and a stronger america. and i'm
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 1:25pm EST
very good friend and neighbor of mine here in washington. and in that remarks i can certainly testify to the -- and in that regard, i can certainly testify to the fact that he's an honorable, interesting, enjoyable person, but that alone doesn't qualify him to hold this high office. he has extraordinary experience. i would say that he is very, very widely acknowledged as one of the best antitrust lawyers in our country, and i would say that this nomination is really a merit-selection nomination. and i'll get to that. he graduated from lawrence university and the school of law at stanford university. he has served with distinction throughout his career, earning accolades such as recognition as the washington, d.c., antitrust lawyer of the year by "best lawyers" and as well as one of the decade's most influential shall lawyers by the "national law journal." he's currently head of the antitrust practice group, a very distinguished proud firm based in washington, arnold & porter. and there he draws and his on his 35 years of experience in civil and criminal investigation to manage
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 6:30am EST
service in the american revolution. he was a general of engineers under george washington and his many of you know, he designed the fortifications at west point. his payment was very long delayed and he finally got it in 1795 your in philadelphia he watches his good friend jefferson, and said would you write a will with me? and he may jefferson the executor. and after they drafted the formal, before they drafted a formal document, he had written something out in his own hand, and i would like to read this to you in conclusion. i bade mr. jefferson that in case i should die without will he should buy out of my money many negroes and free them. that remaining sons should be sufficient to give them education and provide for their means. that is to say, each should know beforehand the duty of a citizen in the free government, that he must defend his country against foreign as well as internal enemies, to have good and human hearts, sensible to the sufferings of others. each one must be married and have 100 acres of land with instruments, cattle for tillage and not to manage and govern as w
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am EST
thurmond begins, it's late july, 1992, and i'm on a flight from washington, d.c. to charlotte, north carolina. i had been an intern that summer up on capitol hill, and one of my regrets of the summer was that i'd never seen strom thurmond. because all my fellow interns said you've got to see strom thurmond. he such an unusual appearance about him. i did know what they meant really your but i had my suspicions. so i'm on the flight and a look ahead in front of me and i see a man who's got kind of orange colored hair practically, so brightly colored. first generation hair plugs. shows you how slow i am that i think to myself, that must be what strom thurmond's head looks like. then, of course, it wasn't strom thurmond. i knew that when people reaching over trying to shake his hand. i wanted to shake his hand, too, because i'd been in d.c. that summer for the first time, and i met all of these politicians i've seen a tv. i was about to go home and speak to my dads rotary club and i wanted to tell them all about the famous people i met up in washington, d.c. and so i was going to try to
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:45pm EST
to mess with washington, d.c., go ahead. that's absolutely fine. but -- [laughter] but i've been living in washington, d.c. for a long time and watching policy debates go on. and i've never seen a president that was as down in the weeds secretly as president bush is. and i just wanted to start with a little anecdote that, actually, i think the 4% solution was visible back then, but way long, long ago in the early years of president bush's administration, he called a bunch of nobel prize-winning economists into the white house to meet x it was my very first time seeing president bush, and i think it was the roosevelt room, it might have been. and i was very nervous, of course, and i wondered what the heck am i doing amongst all these great economistses, and then i wondered what president bush was like. and right at the beginning of the meeting he started requesting questions that had been bugging him about moral hazard of very technological issue. when he came up to washington, he was a policy wonk too. and that's why the bush institute, i think, has been founded, because presiden
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 11:00pm EST
declining enthusiasm. so there's not a republican in washington who describe themselves as a moderate or liberal, but the third of republicans in the country do. >> just to allays this point, rahm emanuel i say the republican party steeply provided to turn this small government land and no government land. there is a truth that not far. i am told we are now at our time. i want mickey to come back with a few closing comments. a part of this but that hasn't gotten as much attention in season mention that i like the bromides we should ignore chapter, which i would reach of the political system will collect no, no. third party to the, no. budget amendment say no. term limits they say no and public financing of elections no. but then i have a whole bunch of things they say yes to and i propose we have an election between the shadow congress and the current congress and then we can see who wins. so let me invite everybody to do closing comments. >> just going down a couple of these. does this represent the republican party as a whole. as citizens just said no, but it does represent is who vote
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 7:00am EST
multiple centers of power. so the task here in washington is going to be very difficult to convince her u.s. government to change the way it has done business for 30 years because a lot of the strategic and current imperatives drive our security. how do you actually play the right role of engaging your? it's not naÏvely giving money to liberal groups and things like this are not having a strategy. i do believe that this is a significant test inside of egypt. it's an encouraging sign, and i think, this is my prediction and were rob and others may disagree, is that it's going to force islamist political parties at least elements of the to change their ideology, if the system remains open and that's the big if, if there's a big debate i don't see it going backwards in terms of the diversity we see in egypt as large as it is it's hard for me to imagine that going backwards. >> okay, we are going to move to our closing remarks and we're going to go in reverse order, so bret, you can have two minutes to make a final plea. >> yeah, in 1979 jean kirkpatrick wrote an influential article, di
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 2:00pm EST
war that we were invaded from both france and in washington sent a telegram to the embassies, which is not far away and i might telegram there was a message from kissinger, secretary of the state department, telling us the israelis, wait. hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger is going to move on with provided doctors. when the telegram was sent from the state department to the embassy during yom kippur, the egyptian and syrian armies were already on their way to destroy the jewish state. that is an example of a mistake because the leader at the time, she was afraid to take a preemptive attack. she was afraid to hold the reserve because she said i don't know what will be the reaction in washington. and dr. kissinger was very strong. nixon was going down, he was going up and she was afraid from his reaction. because of her approach, we almost lost the world. that is why today we do with the issue of iran, we have to take the decision which is good for israel. maybe it will not be popular in the u.n. for sure. everything you say about israel and the standard of the one
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 8:00pm EST
. characterize each one in shorthand beginning with speaker boehner. >> john boehner is a washington lifer and was not the obvious choice to be leading this sort of tea party crafts. nonetheless you can see the tea party phenomenon for the trade -- freight train that it was an elected to be on the train rather than underneath it. speaker boehner campaigned heavily for a number of the tea party freshman andy also you know believe that this presented the republicans and indeed america with a great opportunity. his belief for example was that this would be a perfect run for entitlement reform. if you are are going after entitlement reform ideally you have the bipartisanship specifically at democratic president so they could not walk away from it. and so, he believed that he could leverage the deep conservatism of the tea party. but he has failed to do so and the tea party freshman with whom i have spent a great deal of time and i have spent time with an awful lot of them, liked him personally and found him admirable in the way is a genial ceo but certainly not as there are real leader.
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00am EST
washington, the triumph of free-market economics. of course there was a little premature considering what happened since 2008. we had to revise that. >> how is this book organized? >> well, initially when i tried to do was create an alternative to robert popular book of world philosophers. i wish i had that title. it's the story of the great economic thinkers starting with adam smith and milton friedman. but his perspective, his favorite economist remarked one dublin, and canes, all very pro-government activist, statist from my perspective, i wanted a more balanced approach. saw want to highlight more of the free-market thinkers and what their role was. in fact, the heroic thinker in my book is adams that, the founder of modern economics i discovered by making him the central character of my book and his team of his system of natural liberty which is what he called it in the wealth of nations, i was able to actually tell a story. this book is actually a story that has a plot, hal adams smith and his system of natural liberty are treated overtime, how they come under attack by the mar
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 10:45am EST
washington and elsewhere, quote: like the poor, we have shriver always with us, end of quote. nevertheless, between 1964 and 1968 one-third of america's poor moved upward out of poverty. by the spring of 1968, tension over the budget priorities led shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in stormy chicago, shriver's name again came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on a flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family, still grieving from the recent death of robert, raised an objection in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success in repairing the alliance with france weakened birdies agreement about the vietnam -- by disagreement about the vietnam war, had prompted president pix son to retain him -- nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when democratic nominee george mcgovern was forced to drop his running mate, and eventually through a process of elimin
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 3:00pm EST
in the washington, d.c. and works in treasury can attend one of his father's talks. and i didn't even make him buy the book, which -- [laughter] is the key. i'm particularly proud of scott, and just want to say that. and i look around the room, there are some other good friends including my oldest friend and college roommate, it's just really great just to see so many people here. so i've got 30 minutes, 30, 35 minutes. because what i've learned is, and this is difficult to only speak for 35 minutes on a book because, first of all, professors are programmed to talk at 45-minute intervals. i'm not sure i can do anything in 30 minutes, but i really do try because often times the questions are really the best part. and your questions will allow me to either follow up on areas that i maybe didn't cover, or if i don't like the question, i'll just talk about whatever i want. which, you know, the presidential candidates can do it, i am entitled to do that as well. [laughter] so i want to talk to you about what this book is and what this book is not. i want to introduce you, particularly the
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 11:00am EST
. >> you may recognize garrett peck from a former bookie did a prohibition in washington, d.c. and is back in local history with a new book on the potomac river. where does the potomac river start and where does it in? >> it starts near davis west virginia. it's a ton of ultra girl that comes out of sight of them out and then it ends at point look at which is 11 miles wide. the river is pretty wide at the mouth. in between there's a huge amount of history. there's hundreds of historic sites. essential where our nation grew up on. spent with into a washington, d.c. we think about the washington monument, the white house. people think about the potomac river. why is that? >> what was the last part? >> people think about the white house and the national monument and the potomac river. why is that? >> certain people think about the potomac river, that's one of the things i was trying to push toward. especially for people who live in the washington area, the potomac is seen as an obstacle during their commute to work every day. their driving over it or going under it on the subway. i reall
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:15pm EST
journalist in washington and i want to tell you a little bit about why i came to write a book with a title like this, "the end of men and the rise of women." i have two sons, have a husband, have a father and a brother. i love them all. so i see that the title is very aggressive. nonetheless, how did this come about for me? i will start by telling you the story that inspired me to write this book. my family and i have been vacationing for a long time in this working-class town near washington. one year i went there and i felt like, where were the men? it seemed like they were gone. they weren't on the street during their construction work like they normally work, they didn't seem to be in a church like they normally wear. it was just like a science-fiction moment. it's like, what happened to all the men? i became curious about that. because i am a reporter, you know that once you get an idea in your head and you really can't let go. as a friend of this woman in the supermarket, her name was bethany, i bumped into her and started talking. i said, what's up? are you married? she was not marr
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 12:30pm EST
ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms on which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth, manhattan institute's senior fellow and our speaker this afternoon, focuses in her timely and important new book "regulating to disaster: how green jobs policies are damaging america's economy." in it she subjects the assumptionings and policies which led to such ill-fated federal investments as that of the now-bankrupt solyndra solar panel manufacturer as well as the a123 battery manufacturer to a withering analysis which we at the institute have come to expect from this oxford-trained economists who served as chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her book she adeptly helps us understand why the failures of such direct investments in private firms are both significant problems in the themselves and cautionary tales for those who would have the
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:00pm EST
asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i and his two dogs have lunch together on monday since the dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session and they could of rome and play. was a weird sight, believe me. we were brought into the tiny little conference room, the two dogs, the senator and me with a card table in the middle, and the senator who was always on a diet. he would feel better the center he was head the biggest sand which i'd ever seen like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was and on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of bread and potato chips and we talked for three or four hours. and what i remember saying over and over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i am a historian, and i went find stuff, and whenever i find i'm going to put in the book and who knows, by the time this book comes out there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's naim what the joseph p. kennedy iii who ran f
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 8:00pm EST
scene in ghazi that i, who were in tripoli, who were in washington. .. >> what they had was not enough. either in benghazi or the overwhelming numbers. frankly, the state department had not given security for personal resources it needed. on that note, let me ask admiral mullen in regards to the specific findings. >> thank you, mr. ambassador, i appreciate that. i do appreciate your leadership throughout this process as well. good afternoon. the board found that the attacks on benghazi were security related. responsibility for the loss of life committee injuries, and damage to u.s. facilities rest completely and solely with the terrorists who conducted the attacks. that does not mean that there are lessons to be learned. the board found that the security posture at the special mission compound was inadequate for the threat environment in benghazi, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attacks that took place that night. state department bureau that was supporting benghazi had not taken on security is a shared responsibility. so that support the proposed needed was oft
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 2:00pm EST
washington not so long ago and in the mortgage business everywhere in the country were truly afraid of fannie mae and the retribution it needed out to people who dared to cross it. on hubris, fannie often claiming it was the center of, quote, of the best housing finance system in the world. so ironically in retrospect, of course. this sentiment being echoed by former senator, banking committee chairman dodd, exclaiming that fanny was, quote, one of the great success stories of all time. and so it was until the fall and humiliation. all five acts are very well chronicled by bob's book, but which shakespearean tragedy is this in the background behind the history of fannie mae. thinking of the fear of any, perhaps it is richard iii, with annie and ruthless richard, brought down finally on the field of buzz words by henry paulson playing henry vii or thinking of than fannie ceo dennis mud as presented in the book, pathetically presenting financial plans to a treasury department which have already decided on and was scheduling his fate. is it the great pathos pull abdications seen from r
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 12:00pm EST
not happen. just two weeks after clay's speech, the 30th congress convened in washington and guess who was there? iran led. he heard plays speech in lexington because he was visiting the town on his way from springfield to washington d.c., visiting the family in lexington. while he was there he got to hearing in replace speech. this was a tremendous thing for abraham lincoln. he always idolized like, calling him his bell ideal of a politician and to have the opportunity to hear him speak must've been a huge thing for him. lincoln, when he was young, carry around a book of clay's speeches it used to read into of self, and when he was a young man and legislator he would be president of the classic club and ask henry clay to come speak in springfield. this is really like is opportunity to meet the politician he respects and admires the most and he heard him give a speech against the war. perhaps it is a surprising that when lincoln gets to washington, instead of talking about tariffs or any of the economic issues that have really motivated as a politician, he decides to oppose the war
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:00am EST
meaningful familiar faces. the montgomery block block dominated montgomery and washington streets. number 722 and 724 montgomery. it had been a gold rush tobacco warehouse and now the man, mark twain, setting his cars. it was cold and sweaty in his palm. he took a swig. a few droplets caught in his horseshoe mustache, and he left them there. he spoke and he had become addicted on the mississippi. he contributed his own cloud and by the barrel for $4, he held a cigar poison the air and scattered the vapor with a long sweep of his arms. mark twain had acquired a steam bath in virginia city. while laboring under bronchitis and a series called, 8 miles northwest from the road between virginia city and steamboat springs, a distance of 7 miles. over a long line of beautiful columns, there was a large house constructed to be then. [inaudible] gave me a boiling and surging noise exactly as a steam steamboat bed. sawyer traded and a hot mess. the boards were damp from the sweat running down his arms. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy. new york engine company number 14. san franc
CSPAN
Nov 30, 2012 7:00pm EST
they get out, there's huge risks, but i would urge people in washington would not underestimate the price paid by the debt ceiling debacle of last year. it was not that we downgraded our debt and then our interest rates didn't change. that's a misreading. what happened is that the financial markets are spooked by the uncertainty in washington and by the belief to win anything no matter how stupid, and let us be clear, not raising the debt ceiling on the table again is as stupid a policy as anyone can imagine. the whole debt ceiling doesn't make sense, and the idea you will not raise it when you need to is really playing some form of roulette that's not appropriate. there's a number of changes sense the act that i want to emphasize. in addition to the fact the financial risks are less obvious and pressing on the american public as was mentioned in the last session, the economy is international in the way it was not in 1990. that is, we can talk in 1990 about raising corporate taxes and lowering the tax on dividends, for example, which was one of the policies suggested during the 1990
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 11:00pm EST
, the 30th congress convened in washington. guess who was there? abraham lincoln. he heard clay speech in lexington because he was visiting the town on his way from springfield to washington dc. he was visiting his wife's family in lexington. and this was a tremendous thing for abraham lincoln. lincoln had always idolized clay. he called him his ideal politician, and to have the opportunity to actually hear him speak was a huge thing for him. when lincoln was young, he carried around a book of clay's speech is. and when he was a young man and a legislator, he asked henry clay to come speak in springfield, and clay didn't come. this was his opportunity to meet the politician that he respected and admired the most. and he heard clay and his speech against the war. perhaps it isn't surprising that when he gets to washington, instead of talking about terrorists or any of the economic issues, that motivated him as a politician. and he decides to oppose the war. what are known as spot resolutions. so he gets up and called the president a liar for claiming that american blood was shed on amer
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 5:00pm EST
their income. instead it should be here on us here in washington to justify taking more away from them. secondly, there is a tendency on the other side to view everything as a zero-sum game. in their mind, if someone has more, it means someone else will have less. so i'd like to quote ronald reagan as the best example of this attitude in washington. too many people in washington -- quote -- "can't see a fat man standing beside a thin one without coming to the conclusion that the fat man got that way by taking advantage of the thin one," end of reagan quote. i believe this is what is driving the animas against the so-called wealthy on the other side. they are under the impression the wealthy got rich at the expense of someone less fortunate. the problem with this view is that in a free economy, goods and services are transferred through voluntary exchanges. both parties are better off as a result of this exchange. otherwise it wouldn't occur. moreover, wealth is not static. it can be both created as well as destroyed. at worst, the government is a destroyer of wealth. at best, the gover
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 11:00pm EST
the lerner family associate dean for public interest and public service law at the george washington university school of law. he is responsible for creating pro bono opportunities for students, bringing a wide range of public interest programs to the law school, encouraging students to seek positions in the nonprofit and government sectors, and assisting students to find ways to fund legal education to make it possible for them to pursue careers outside of traditional law firms. most of his career, deena morrison work for the public citizen litigation group, which she cofounded with ralph nader in 1972, and directed for over 25 years. his work included open government, opening up the legal profession, suing agencies that failed to apply comply with the law, protecting the rights of consumers, and protecting unrepresented class members in class action settlements. he has argued 20 cases in the supreme court, including victories in the virginia state board of pharmacy, virginia citizens consumer council, making it subject to the first amendment. and striking out over 200 federal laws
CSPAN
Dec 19, 2012 11:00pm EST
florida. surely come thanks for joining us on the "washington journal". >> caller: good morning. i worked in mental health services around 20 years after it raised my family and myself. twenty years of that was then ejected. in the hospitals. i suffer from depression. and i found that i have allergies. there is a book and he talks about how allergies can affect us so severely that it can cause things like depression, retardation, epilepsy and many physical ailments as well. hypertension and hyperglycemia and etc. and it is hard and people look at me like i'm crazy. and i say, look at your diet. many people believe that schizophrenia can be cured by diet? >> host: congressman? >> guest: there are a lot of things that go into this. you people have food reactions and supplements that can affect them? yes. as a cause of schizophrenia, i don't know. i don't want people to think that if only i change my diet, it will go away. there are a lot of other issues there. there are genetic issues, environmental issues, many other aspects here. working with this for 35 years, working in the navy reserve
CSPAN
Dec 11, 2012 12:00pm EST
"washington journal" focus on domestic program cuts. >> host: domestic spending cuts is on the table for the fiscal cliff talks. two different perspectives for you here. isabel sawhill, brookings institution. brookings center on children and families. james capretta ethics and public policy center and visiting scholar at aei. let me begin with you. are these potential domestic cuts under sequestration devastating or manageable? >> guest: somewhere in between. not a good idea. they would be very deep cuts, you know, an 8% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world, no? >> host: what do you mean by that? >> guest: well, i mean there would be downsizing of a lot of services across the government in terms of the domestic accounts. so it would be fewer services being provided. there would be reduced federal employees. some grant programs would take a haircut of five, 10%. so there would be downsizing of the services provided by the federal government. but the economy woul
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30pm EST
pretty much fulfilled george washington's third term in national security matters. >> finally, how did the middle-class figure into your thesis? >> while the middle-class figures then, and they are the ones that got shafted because there was a bipartisan move. clinton was president. the republicans mainly were running congress when we have rings like nafta, china's most favored nation status, the wto, the world trade organization. all these trade deals -- trade deals that people believed were going to bring jobs to the united states, and in every case the jobs left. >> in now on booktv, the history of united states in 1862. is the second year the civil war and specifically reactions of president abraham lincoln. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> the thank you very much. a wonderful crowd. thank you to regnery books, a real asset to our community here. with all these programs. i am glad to see my kids in the audience, who asked me to mention their names. henry, alice, abby, claire and my wife karen is here and my mother doris and many friends but also the basis as well. than
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 8:30am EST
washington post staff writer, he is also the author of "the rise of marco rubio." manuel roig-franzia, what should we know about pube -- marco rubio that we may not know right now? >> guest: well, what you ought to know is that he is more than any other republican politician positioned to have a big impact on what that party does vis-a-vis immigration. such an important issue, such an important demographic. and it was proven in the election, and you're going to be hearing a lot from him on that topic in the next four years. >> host: is so how did he play it in the 2012 cycle? >> guest: well, he was a big surrogate for mitt romney. he traveled all over the country. it was a terrific way to introduce him to people outside of florida. even though he's very popular in florida and had a stunning victory in the 2010 senate race -- not a win that a lot of people expected him to get when that race started, you know, he was facing this very tough candidate, charlie crist, who was a popular governor at the time -- but outside of florida his profile was much smaller. and now he's been introduced
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
is here in washington and send an e-mail to somebody in kenya, how does that get tracked? >> guest: you could be -- though it's interesting. if you asked that question two years ago the answer would be different. today only recently now, does kenya have good direct physical connections to the internet rather than relying on satellite transmission. i cannot most guarantee that from washington to kenya, would go through in building in ashburn virginia through building called equinox. i could be 80% sure it would then go through six and lower manhattan which is one of the major nodes, the international airport so to speak for the transatlantic cables. the undersea cables across the atlantic and transit the vast majority of information and i can almost guarantee you will go through a single building in london on the building called telehouse which is the kind of u.k. and europe equivalent to ashburn and the buildings in the u.s.. and i know that in particular because the two cables down the east coast of africa does have their major hubs, their major nodes at telehouse in london. from
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 7:30pm EST
washington and his underpants or abraham lincoln. at least for my students at rutgers university where you teach because for them, martin luther king is ruling the past, back there with washington or lincoln. all of american history before they were born is ancient history to them. but in any case, here he was in his white boxer shorts. i go in and we americans are informal. he'd been taking a nap, i understood this perfectly. and i began to talk to him, look, we've got to do something about the media because they found shoe. i found your comments are going to find you. and if what you want to do is take it easy today, i want to help you take easy today. and here's what i recommend. i recommend that the press attachÉ at the embassy set up a press conference at half-an-hour in the ballroom at the hotel, limit it to a half-an-hour. i'll do the interpreting and help set it up for an hour from now. i said though, i understand you're tired and you're just here to see the town really, but if we don't do that, they're going to be following us out of the town. the paparazzi would drive us cra
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:00pm EST
realized it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in session and they could roam and play in the senate. that's a weird site, believe me. we were brought into a tiny little conference room for two dogs, senator and me with the card table and the senator, who was always on the target. they believed he would feel better the center he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was end on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of red in potato chips. we talked for three, four hours. but i remember saying over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i'm an historian and i'm going to find stuff. whatever i find, i'm going to put the book. and who knows, but by the time this book comes out, there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's na
CSPAN
Dec 18, 2012 9:00am EST
then it flips. it's now 75-25. you know, the overwhelming number of people going between washington, d.c. and new york prefer to take the train. it's not because that is always cheaper. because the service is not. it's because of the time savings and convenience. >> mr. boardman, for the northeast corridor, 80% of the population lives within 25 miles of the northeast corridor making the rail very, very accessible. how would you compare that with california? >> depends on the part of california. one of the things i can answer is, congressman, is that the air rail service between san diego and l.a. is entirely real because it just doesn't work the way that that has, as close as the arts which have and the way that it operates. but when you get to something like l.a. to san francisco you really only have the coast starlight. so there's a sufficient amount of data that would really tell you what really happened here. so from that regard, the old drink am anna karenina right now what they called it, i guess it was the coast daylight, was the primary way they moved up until 15 years ago b
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 1:00pm EST
library of congress and washington d.c. >> earlier this year walter dean myers was named as the third national ambassador for and people's literature this is a non-profit arm, every child a reader. the notion of the national ambassador would be someone who traveled the country on behalf of young people's literature promoting it and also expanding the audience for reading in every way that we can think of. my proper today you already have . on the table in the back there is a bookmark which has walters photo and also a brief explanation of the national ambassador program. it lasts for two years. walter is midway through his 2-year term speaking on behalf of reading. today we're going to learn a little bit about his experience, but i would like to start by asking him how he chose his particular theme for his activity, which is reading is not optional. walter, do you want to tell us a little bit about how that came to be your team and a little bit about -- i happen to know it is his own early background that helped lead to this. >> as i began speaking to young people and how we approach
CSPAN
Dec 14, 2012 8:00pm EST
to have you back at the podium. he can second will be eric trager. he is the washington institute's next generation fellow. he is a doctoral candidate at the university of pennsylvania where he completed a dissertation and he is going to give us some special insight into some of the details of mohammed morsi and the muslim brotherhood in the quest to achieve a constitution. and then we have third, i am pleased to introduce a diplomat of the area. he served in egypt for 2005 through 2010. shalom cohen. he has considerable it's aryans with the relationship and the politics we are seeing on the ground today. first we have steve and eric and then shalom cohen, and then we will open up the discussion for your questions and comments. >> good afternoon. it is a tremendous ledger to be back at the washington institute. i feel a a little nervous, i feel like i'm performing for my first grade teacher again. but it is a great pleasure. this is where, as rob pointed out, my career began. also, those of you who know me, this is where my family began. i am sure that many of you in washington can
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